Defense Attorney

The State Bar of Wisconsin – A Day With the Experts in Criminal Defense



The State Bar of Wisconsin’s Pinnacle Program and program director, attorney John A. Birdsall, will present a CLE seminar focused on criminal defense. “A Day with the Experts in Criminal Defense” seminar will take place Friday, June 13, 2014 in Madison, WI.

CLE events are designed to further legal education and hone your expertise as an attorney. John A. Birdsall is proud to be a part of this seminar and continue his personal tradition of education.

media_httpwwwwisbaror_gyatj-scaled500

About the Seminar

The prosecution can seem pretty intimidating in a criminal case – with a virtual army of police, investigators, forensic scientists, and medical experts arrayed against your client. On the other hand, as in football or chess, these’s an equal and opposite defense to every prosecutorial move. This CLE seminar will further your understanding of criminal defense and hone your skills as a defense attorney.

Along with John A. Birdsall and the panel of criminal defense experts, you’ll

  • Unlock the mysteries of a typical DNA report as well as the laboratory procedures, technical language, and the strengths and weaknesses of the conclusions
  • Be aware of the common problems with the eyewitness identification and learn how to challenge the reliability of eyewitnesses
  • Recognize the contributing factors to unreliable child forensic interviews and learn specific methods to challenge the prosecutor’s experts
  • Learn the risk factors leading to false (and not so false) confessions, how to analyze them, and how to challenge them in court

 

Register today online by clicking here or by phone at (800)-728-7788

 

 

 

Many people ask: Will I be convicted of the crime I am charged with?

Theodore Perlick Molinari commments on the fact that he is often asked what kind of results a client can expect in a case. This is a difficult question to answer. However, here are some things to consider:

How To Avoid an Illegal Search

The police are at my door right now and they want to search the house. Should I allow them inside?

Posted 11 months ago. 1 helpful vote, Comments (0)

John A. Birdsall

Written by: John A. Birdsall

Attorney licensed in Wisconsin

Contributor Level 4

No.

Instead, demand a warrant. This requires that the police go to a judge and show probable cause that evidence of a crime is in the house, and they must be able to detail what that evidence is. If you consent to a search without a warrant, you will lose your right to challenge the search in court. Warrants can only be issued using “reliable” information. If the search is illegal and not based on credible information, you can bring a motion to suppress as evidence anything that was taken, meaning it will not be allowed at your trial.

Even if you think you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to gain by consenting.

More information about Birdsall Law Offices at www.birdsall-law.com

The Police are at my door right now and want to question me. Should I talk?

In a word: No
1

Do Not Succumb to Seemingly Informal Questioning

Most cases that end up being charged criminally are the result of interrogations such as this. It’s almost always a bad idea to talk to police until after you know what they’re looking for, even if you believe you’re not in trouble or that you’ve done nothing wrong.

2

Be Wary of Your Words

Keep in mind that anything you say may be used to incriminate you. Seemingly harmless statements such as “I may have hit the guy” and “I had a beer a few hours ago” may turn into “the suspect admitted to hitting the victim” and “the suspect had been drinking.”

3

Get, Help, Get Help, Get Help

It’s vital to seek the help of a lawyer who specializes in criminal law and understands police tactics. When interrogating you, the police will often lie about evidence, pressure you, threaten you with arrest, assure you that all will be easier if you simply confess, or even tell you that you will “feel better after you confess.” An experienced criminal defense attorney can guide you through this process and advise you on what to say, and what to not say.

4

Silence Is Golden

Especially if you are nervous, tired, scared, or under the influence, it is best to exercise your Fifth Amendment right to silence until you’ve consulted a lawyer.